MORA in the Trees

MORA in the Trees
Mt. Rainier through a variable retention harvest at Pack Forest, Washington, USA

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Restoring the West featured in the Logan Herald Journal (#RTW2014)

Last week I had the pleasure of sitting down with Utah State Forestry Extension's Darren McAvoy and Kevin Opsahl of the Logan Herald Journal to discuss this year's Restoring the West conference (#RTW2014 on Twitter). Kevin's write up is here and highlights the importance and rationale for convening the upcoming meeting with a riparian restoration focus. In short, streams have been used for a variety of management purposes, some of which have led to degradation of the services that rivers and their riparia provide: clean and abundant water, riparian habitat for wildlife, instream habitat for fish and other aquatic biota, and controls on how streams adjust their channels in response to water and sediment supply.

http://news.hjnews.com/allaccess/usu-to-host-restoring-the-west-conference/article_54021558-21b2-11e4-9784-0019bb2963f4.html


Kevin also quotes me in discussing the very successful Spawn Creek grazing exclosure in the Logan River watershed (see details: here, here, here, and on this blog). Thanks to Kevin and the Herald Journal for covering this year's conference and taking the time to discuss riparian zones with Darren and I!

A little incision and a little algae: can it be restored to a more functional state?

Monday, August 11, 2014

Restoring the West (#RTW2014) registration now open!

Registration is now open for this year's Restoring the West conferenceDown by the River: Managing for Resilient Riparian Corridors, this October 21-22 on the campus of Utah State University in Logan, UT.

You can register at: http://restoringthewest.org/Registration.cfm?pg=re

Early registration at discounted rates runs through Thursday, October 9th.

If you can't make the conference, Joe Wheaton, faculty in Watershed Sciences will offer a free pre-conference webinar entitled What role might beaver play in restoring the West? as a part of USU Forestry Extension's ongoing outreach efforts. The date and time are TBA, but stay tuned to USU forestry extension and http://etal.joewheaton.org for more details.

Beaver dam and willow forest above Cottonwood Lake, Cottonwood Creek, WY, USA

The ecologist's soundtrack

One thing that has always chapped my hide, at least professionally, is how ecologists and environmental scientists listen to pretty homogenous music. For people with diverse academic and personal interests (at least a few ecologists know there is life beyond work), it's kind of weird. I mean, I know it's like 90% upper-middle class white kids from the suburbs who go into the ecology field, but still, we can, and arguably should, branch out musically. I mean this as an entire profession. We have to read widely to be experts in a given field. We work in some of the most biologically diverse places in the world, and often write our papers from offices in major metropolitan areas or places of high cultural diversity, like major college campuses. We have the internet. Yet, many practicing ecologists have failed to get the memo that there is music that requires electricity or lacks banjo. A conversation on music at ESA or your other favorite professional conference would probably go something like this:

A: So you're interested in conserving biodiversity in rare ecosystems?

B: Yes, namely aquatic macroinvertebrates in boreal rivers and forest pollinators in subalpine heathland matrices.

A: Cool. Where do you work?

B: Alaska and the Northwest Territories

A: Right on. What do you like to do aside from work?

B: There are things other than work?

A: Yeah, like music, art, sports, travel.

B: I do like music, mostly bluegrass and folk.

A: Rad. So, you only like music that lacks drums?

B: Well, now that you mention it, I guess those subgenres do lack drums. But I find rap to be hostile and rock to be too caustic and shocking. It's all so commercial and consumer-driven. I like real, home-grown music.

A: That's cool, where's home? I mean, where are you from?

B: Long Island, but I went to school in New Jersey and Connecticut.

A: Righteous, lots of, uh, good bluegrass out that way, I surmise...

The reality is, ecologists and academics don't have to fall into the bluegrass trap. There are musical genres with drums. Folk is not the only way forward. You can head bang. You can dance. Music can be made by people who don't own sandals or plaid shirts. And you can listen to it. Next time you crack open R, revise a manuscript, or key a plant, I suggest the following for your headphones:













Thursday, August 7, 2014

#OpenAccess Article Alert: Direct and indirect drivers of instream wood in the interior Pacific Northwest, USA

While I briefly touched on the instream wood research that Alan Kasprak, Brett Roper, Christy, Meredith and I completed earlier this year, I wanted to take a moment to discuss both the rationale for our research and the rationale for where we published it in a longer article alert. 

A big question in federal and state aquatic monitoring programs is how riparian vegetation data can be used to make inference about aquatic ecosystems. This is partly because many programs have access to classified NAIP or LANDFIRE imagery that can be used to assess forest and rangeland changes following disturbances like wildfire, management actions like grazing retirement, or road building. Many organizations also measure riparian forest structure or composition as indicators of the integrity of the matrix surrounding a given stream network. This data can be used to assess individual streams over time or to compare the riparian composition and structure of groups of streams across successional or environmental gradients. Riparian vegetation is a bit political however, and fisheries and watershed managers often want to know, "what does riparian vegetation tell us about stream habitat quality, geomorphic change, or management impacts to the channel or fish population?" Because riparian vegetation is the keystone element of many stream networks, conferring shade to channel, stabilizing banks, contributing allochthonous energy to aquatic foodwebs, and forming habitat units like undercut banks, the popular thought has been that vegetation should be an indicator of aquatic processes and/or health. The relationships between riparian vegetation and aquatic ecosystem status have been well elucidated in the macroinvertebrate and fish literature.
Undercut banks are an important fish habitat type that is formed when flows carve out refugia along the active channel under riparian meadow and forest vegetation. http://water.epa.gov/type/rsl/monitoring/vms41.cfm

Accordingly, the project that would become our manuscript was undertaken as an early stab at identifying how large-scale monitoring data can be used to make inference about the drivers of aquatic ecosystem services. In the case of small streams, we know that instream wood (also often called large woody debris) is an important driver of channel change in small streams. For example, trees fall into channels where they shape local hydraulics that cause heterogeneity in shear stress that sorts sediment, forces scour and creates complex step-pool riffles (also referred to as plane-bed morphology). These geomorphic units are often tied to fish life cycles as fish use pools to forage or as refugia from predation and riffles for spawning. But what does it take to get trees into the channel as instream wood? Well, intuitively, trees or large shrubs that grow large enough to influence small channels. What changes the composition of a stream's riparian vegetation and will this influence instream wood loading? 

We started by assessing how much wood has been found in 720 low-order streams of the interior Columbia and upper Missouri River basins, USA. We looked at trends between environmental gradients, including climate, management, and matrix forest cover. In short, the coolest, wettest areas exhibited more large, long-lived and persistent tree species like Pseudotsuga menziesii, Thuja plicata, and Picea engelmannii and were unlikely to have recently burned or be heavily grazed. In short, forested areas have different climates than shrubland or grassland ecotones. We also saw that these species that occurred at reaches with heavy instream wood loads had distinct channel morphologies: they were wider, steeper and more likely to connect to steep hillslopes in the surrounding watershed.



A visual on the different riparian ecosystems based on their wood loading. Reaches are shown from first quartile to fourth quartile (least to most wood).
Given the correlations between riparian vegetation composition and instream wood loads and environmental gradients and riparian vegetation, we built a path model to look at how environmental change in climate, channel form and disturbance shape vegetation and how vegetation shapes instream wood. The big takeaway was visualized in a massive spaghetti-monster of a structural model: 
Nobody should ever forgive me for the complexity of this graph. Ever.
In short, wood volume and frequency were positively correlated to the forested vegetation types within the NMDS ordination. Woody vegetation was negatively correlated to grazing and wildfire and positively correlated to precipitation and catchment elevation, which also corresponded to wider channels with lower gradients, a product of numerous wide, low-elevation channels in Idaho's northern panhandle forests. We can infer from these relationships that anything that shapes either the ability of a landscape to grow and maintain forest vegetation or any factor that changes the channel dynamics responsible for transporting large wood will likely change instream wood loads. Accordingly, any area where woody vegetation might be predicted to decline due to climate change or disturbance will likely show less instream wood. In many cases, the relationships could be more complex, such as when a fire or insect outbreak kills trees that are quickly contributed to the active channel, but understory recruitment maintains riparian wood production. These same disturbances might also change channel forms to types that evacuate rather than store wood as water and sediment are rapidly evacuated from hillslopes, reshaping channels in large flow events. While not a conclusive predictive model of future scenarios, we outlined that direct vegetative and indirect climatic and disturbance effects are responsible for how wood loading varies across landscapes. Accordingly, managers can visualize the different gradients across which instream wood targets should be set, modifying goals in areas where wood recruitment is unlikely due to potential riparian vegetation composition.


We chose to publish this article in the open-access riparian ecology journal, Riparian Ecology and Conservation. I learned of the journal by chance in early 2013 when looking around for open access journals that catered to the applied water resources and ecology communities. I was pleased by the quality and thoroughness of the reviews that we received, even if southern hemisphere field work led to a less rapid review process than we had initially anticipated. With a great editorial board that includes Christer Nilsson, John Stella, Henri DeCamps, Lee Brown, and Editor, Yixin Zhang, I think that eventually the journal will rise to mid-level sub-disciplinary prominence amid Wetlands, Hydrobiologia, and River Research and Applications. This may happen quickly as all articles are distributed under a Creative Commons attribution license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0).


Friday, August 1, 2014

#RTW2014: "Down by the River: Managing for Resilient Riparian Corridors"


As of this morning, the annual Restoring the West conference agenda has been announced! With a riparian focus, this year's conference will feature agency and academic scientists discussing the restoration and management of riparian resources in three thematic areas: land management, global change, and environmental flows. I'm excited to hear keynote talks from David Merritt (USFS), Bob Beschta (Oregon State University) and Heida Diefenderfer (Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory).

The full (preliminary) agenda can be found here.

In addition, there will be a pre-Restoring the West webinar through Utah State Forestry Extension this September, focusing on the development of Joe Wheaton and Wally MacFarlane's Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool and a stream restoration project in Utah using beaver to restore incised streams.

Be sure to follow Restoring the West on Twitter using #RTW2014. 


Here are the full details from this year's promotional flier:


Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Photos from the field: July 2014

Writing, field work, travel, and my latest obsession, trail running have all led to a pretty good summer so far. While it hasn't made for much time to blog about science, my own or others', I've met some great scientists, athletes and new friends while sharing new experiences, academic and athletic with my old friends and family. While I get ready to write up some PR on my most recent papers, here is a photo- teaser from July 2014 in Arizona, Utah, Idaho and Washington State. Hopefully we'll have a rocking August of data collection and big runs as I prep for 
Lexine and Cedar atop Humphrey's Peak, AZ

Loading up the RTK GPS with our control network for a field hitch
Logan before another long day on the ridge gunning for our crew

Channel incision + two-meter Salix = 3+ meter rods

Symphyotrichum up Stump Hollow

Castilleja at Peter Sinks

Greene Machine at the turn-around at Peter Sinks
Marco treks to the backsight...again...at the current restoration site.
Andy and Greene Machine admire my future field site in Idaho
Erik and John atop the Wellsville Wilderness Ridge
Raft River Mountain Fly-over
Lexine and Lloyd trekking out of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness
Final steps of the Logan Peak Trail Run, 5:17:58

Logan Peak elevation profile
So. Pumped. This paper was first submitted elsewhere in March of 2013 and got some really good reviews along the way. Hopefully in its best form as it goes to press.

Friday, June 27, 2014

M.S Research Assistantship in Redwood Forest Ecology - Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, CA

Here's a cool job/grad school position that I'm reposting for a friend:

Early Career Ecologists' own Sarah Bisbing is looking for a qualified individual to fill a masters level position at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, California, USA.

Position: I am seeking a highly motivated, independent M.S. student to join my new Forest Ecology & Silviculture lab at California Polytechnic State University (http://nres.calpoly.edu). One graduate research assistantship is available to support research on regeneration dynamics and stand development of coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) following exposure to interacting disturbances (e.g. silvicultural treatment, wildfire, etc.). This study is designed to provide insight into this species’ response to novel conditions and susceptibility to climate change. Field research will occur across the
species’ range, from the Oregon border south to Big Sur, California. There is flexibility in the pursuit of research questions, and the successful applicant can build on the funded study by developing and implementing an independent thesis research project. Qualifications: Applicants should have an excellent academic record, a strong interest in forest and landscape ecology, and a desire to improve quantitative and writing skills. Student must be willing and able to conduct extensive fieldwork in difficult terrain and train technicians in field techniques and sampling protocols. Preference will be given to students with a strong ecological background and prior field/research experience.
You can study these...but probably smaller versions.

Support Package: A research stipend and tuition are available for a 2-year program, contingent on satisfactory performance and degree progress. Research support and potential housing may also be available for summer fieldwork through Cal Poly’s Swanton Pacific Ranch (www.spranch.org). Anticipated start date of January 2015.

How to Apply: To apply, please send (1) a letter of interest, including: research interests, career goals, and relevant past experiences; (2) a resume or CV; (3) GRE scores; (4) unofficial academic transcripts; and (5) contact telephone numbers and email addresses for three references. Submit application materials as a single pdf file to Dr. Sarah Bisbing at sbisbing@calpoly.edu. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.

Contact:
Sarah M. Bisbing, PhD
Assistant Professor, Silviculture & Forest Ecology

NRES Department
California Polytechnic State University
1 Grand Ave
San Luis Obispo, CA 93407
805-756-2721 (office)

sbisbing@calpoly.edu

Sunday, June 22, 2014

The return of field season: June 2014 in photos

Big days, big groceries...plus cow skull.

Friday night willows.

The rare cool days.



Beaver-induced, cattle-modified.

ET-AL and UDWR personnel, Joe Wheaton, Elijah Portugal and Kent Sorenson talk shop on river character and behavior.

Good light where Utah drains to the Snake River.

Snow in June.

Field gurus Logan and Marco sample the colonel's recipe in Idaho...they've travelled every road in this here land. It's no Bakersfield, CA.

I-84, Oregon

Five points, Grande Ronde Basin, OR

Break lines and Ponderosa pines.

Tent village in Cove, OR

Friday, June 13, 2014

June update: publications, posters and travel

champmonitoring.org


I just returned from a 12-days of training for the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program in Cove, OR, where my field colleagues and I got all trained up for the 2014 field campaign. Before that, I was presenting my work and doing some other professional service at the Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting in Portland, OR. Both the SWS undergraduate mentoring program and the technical sessions were fantastic. Per normal, it was great to see my colleagues from across the SWS-Pacific Northwest region. By the way, the PNW chapter has a new website and it's pretty slick. The SWS Restoration section put on their second annual session and it went off without a hitch. Thanks to all of the 2014 participants for giving talks and Andy Herb for helping to coordinate! I gave a poster on instream wood in the PIBO and CHaMP programs. It was great to get feedback on my projects. The poster is online at Figshare:



CHaMP camp in the Grande Ronde basin - surveying to build digital elevation models of streams.

During all the travel and hustle, a couple research items came up and out. First, my collaboration with my ET-AL colleague Alan Kasprak, and colleagues from my time at the USFS, Brett Roper and Christy Meredith, came out in Riparian Ecology and Conservation. The article went live last week and I'm proud to say that it's my first open-access publication. We got some great reviews and the publication process, while not extremely fast, was professional, constructive and relatively painless. I think the revisions we made based on reviewer feedback really improved the final product and I greatly appreciate the time the three reviewers and Dr. Jon Harding, our handling editor took to give professional and constructive feedback. The article, in short, looks at how climate, disturbance and stream physical setting influence the accumulation of large wood in wadeable streams of the American Pacific Northwest. We found that as climate and disturbance shape vegetation composition, the capability of the riparian ecosystem to grow and contribute wood to channels is changed. We identified the indicator species that correspond to high, moderate and low instream wood, and found that not surprisingly, hot, dry climates with grazing impacts don't generally grow trees. We conclude that stream management and restoration scenarios cannot assume that wood, while a keystone geomorphic driver of aquatic habitat formation, will naturally occur. Accordingly, in unforested reaches managers should consider other processes, like beaver reintroduction, when trying to change instream hydraulic and hydrologic diversity to increase habitat diversity.

This manuscript is freely-available as a pdf at Riparian Ecology and Conservation
Additionally, some relatively long-term work that my former UW colleague, Rodney Pond and I have done in North Cascades National Park is coming out in Ecological Restoration this September. We received proofs, and have made a pre-print version available over at figshare. You can find it here and below. I'll do a quick write-up on the paper when it comes out in the journal issue.



Hopefully I'll find the time for some more blogging amid data collection, finishing existing projects and getting ready for some delayed qualifying exams.


Updated publications page links!